String Quartet Divertimento in F Major Op. 3 No. 5 “Serenade” arr. for Flute and Piano n.d.

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)

Program note written by Jacob Farmer

Movements:
I. Presto
II. Andante Cantabile
III. Menuetto – Trio
IV. Scherzando

Approximate Performance Time:
16 minutes

Difficulty:
Advanced Intermediate – appropriate for advanced high school students and college undergraduates

Recordings:
James Galway & Hiro Fujikake. Serenade, Op. 3, No. 5. Sony Music, 2014. MP3.

Source Article:
FRUEHWALD, SCOTT. “AUTHENTICITY PROBLEMS IN FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN’S EARLY INSTRUMENTAL WORKS: A STYLISTIC INVESTIGATION.” Order No. 8423057 City University of New York, 1984. Ann Arbor: ProQuest. Web. 1 Oct. 2016.

Biography:
Franz Joseph Haydn, born 1732 in Rohrau, started his training as a chorister at St Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna. Shortly thereafter he received an appointment to a musical established owned by Count Morzin. Following Morzin’s service, he went on to the Eszterháza Princes and took over as Kapellmesister. Haydn spent a large portion of his life on the estate of Eszterháza, until the price died in 1790, thus releasing Haydn of his obligations to stay. He traveled to London, and entered into service for Prince Nikolaus. Haydn retired and died in Vienna in 1809 as Napoleon took siege of the city. His works widely consisted of his 108 symphonies, in addition to church music, oratorios, stage works, vocal works, and chamber music.

Piece Information:
These types of pieces were normally played during an opera as an interposed event to create dramatic suspense before an important scene in the plot. The word divertimento literally means diversion. The bookend movements were normally marches to announce the entrance and departure of the musicians. The middle movements were typically minuets including the Serenade portion. The second movement of this piece is the Serenade of the work and is one of the most well-known string quartet melodies. This quartet is also attributed to Roman Hoffstetter, an admirer of Franz Joseph Haydn. Hoffstetter has been attributed to at least two of the six quartets in this collection and has been known as a good imitator of Haydn.